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House President: Possible solutions did not represent Cyprus people's interests
2004-12-22 10:28:16

Nicosia, Dec 22 (CNA) -- Cyprus House of Representatives President Demetris Christofias has said the Cyprus problem has not been solved because the stance of the international community on one hand and Turkey's on the other led to possible solutions that did not represent the interests of Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots, but the interests of third countries.

Christofias stressed that the United States and Britain were not only responsible for the so-called isolation of the Turkish Cypriots but during the 16-17 December EU Summit in Brussels they also tried to secure that there would not be any reference in the EU conclusions to Turkey's obligations as regards the Cyprus Republic.

The Cypriot official noted that the Greek Cypriots' negative stance towards the Annan plan for a settlement should trouble all those who are trying to find a solution to the Cyprus problem that will respond to the Cyprus people's interests, something that was not though achieved.

He said measures taken to relieve Turkish Cypriots were somehow retributive for the Greek Cypriots.

''The stance of the international community, firstly, and of Turkey, secondly, led to possible solutions that did not represent the interests of the Cyprus people as a whole, Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots, and took into consideration the interests of third parties, and that is why a solution did not come up,'' he noted.

Regarding the so-called isolation of the Turkish Cypriots, Christofias said ''this was not due to the Cyprus Republic'' but ''to those who divided Cyprus into two with the use of force.''

He pointed out that ''it is Turkey that has to be blamed and those who support Turkey, the Americans and the British, who worked behind the scenes during the EU Summit, to avoid any word to be included in the EU conclusions that would refer to Turkey's obligations as regards the Cyprus Republic.''

''This creates feelings of repugnance and feelings we did not want to have, because we are not anti-Americans or anti-British by nature,'' he noted.

He also said that these feelings do not have to do with the peoples of the two countries but with the policy their leaders follow all these years.

Christofias vowed that ''we will continue our struggle with dignity, always having in mind the interests of the Cyprus people as a whole,'' adding: ''we want a solution.''

Cyprus has been divided since 1974 when Turkish troops invaded and occupied 37 per cent of its territory.

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